Though driving in the city can be stressful and dangerous, this does not necessarily mean that the countryside is any safer. Drivers in Virginia may be more or less familiar with rural roads, but what they must remember is that these roads present their own types of dangers.

Rural roads are usually two lanes, and the lanes tend to be narrow. It’s not uncommon for head-on collisions to occur on them. Other times, there can be single-vehicle crashes where drivers run off the road and collide with a fixed object. In addition, drivers are more likely to encounter wildlife on rural roads, which may cause them to lose control of their car if they are not paying attention. Another challenge is the poor lighting of country roads.

Drivers, by underestimating the risks involved on rural roads, may become inattentive and even deliberately reckless: For example, they may endanger themselves and others by neglecting to wear a seat belt, speeding, drifting out of their lane or driving under the influence of alcohol. They may be more likely to engage in this kind of behavior due to the absence of police.

As for what drivers can do to protect themselves on rural roads, it all begins with defensive driving. Drivers should not assume that others are looking out for their safety; rather, they should expect the worst and stay attentive.

If drivers let their guard down, they may be in car accidents and be partially at fault for them. Virginia follows the rule of pure contributory negligence, which means that no crash victim can file a claim and be compensated if he or she is even 1% at fault. It may be wise, then, for victims to have a lawyer assess their case. If it holds up to this strict rule, the lawyer may work to gather evidence and negotiate for a settlement.